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A MESSAGE FROM SAMHSA
Actually Do Yourself A Favor
Actually You'll do yourse
Actually you'll do yourself a fa
Add your comments - go for it
Addiction is hereditary
An address everyone needs
An upbeat Website
BE GOOD TO YOURSELF
Can't hurt to look into it
Do something
Do you fit into this scenario
Do You Fit Into This Scenario?
Do your best
Do Yourself A Favor
Don't be a loner
Don't be Alone
Don't give up - think positive
FOR THOSE WHO LIKE TO WRITE
GO FOR IT
Good Advice
HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT IT
Hello Again
Help Available
Helpful info
Hope and more hope
How do you fit into this scenari
Info that can change your life
It can change your life
IT NEEDS TO BE YEAR ROUND
IT'S ALL ABOUT PREVENTION
IT'S PREVENTION WEEK
JOBS, INTERNSHIPS, VOLUNTEER WOR
JOBS, INTERNSHIPS, VOLUNTEERING
JUST DO IT
Keep Talking
Lets get rid of them
Lets think this through
Make a resolution
One should talk about Sex
Please, please look at this
Recovery Month
Resolutions - Yes? No?
Share what you know
Something to consider
Something you'll want to know
Stress, Stress
STUFF YOU NEED TO KNOW
The contest you have been waitin
The holidays are here again
There are solutions
There have been good reports
They'll take your phone call
Think - intervention
Think about it
Think about your future
THINK FUN
think TV
This is good advice
This is worth looking into
Time to think
To help you think this through
Try writing
Want You To Know
WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?
What Do You Think
Yes, a good night's sleep is imp
Yes, it's important
You got to try this
You Need To Know
You owe it to yoursel to read th
You'll appreciate this info
You've got to visit this
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Answers For Teens Blog
Sunday, 11 November 2018
TAKE A LOOK AT HALT
Topic: BE GOOD TO YOURSELF

November 11, 2018

I have lately come across the Acronym HALT. A quick visit to www.acronymattic.com revealed that there are 25 different acronyms for HALT. Alcoholics Anonymous chat slang refers to HALT as: Hope, Acceptance, Love, Tolerance. 

The meaning of HALT which caught my eye was Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired. Basically HALT is just common sense that can lead to a happier life. Lets take a look.


HUNGRY: Yes, good nutrition is important. Are you eating properly? Come on, be good to yourself. If you are not sure what you need to eat check out the U.S. government food pyramid.

https://www.cnpp.usda.gov/FGP
ANGRY: Are you angry? Many of us are. Take a journal and make a list of what is making you angry. Do you feel you have been mistreated? What can you do to alleviate your anger? Is there a therapy group that you can join? Alateen meetings lets you talk and express your feelings? If you have health insurance it may cover private therapy. A university near you may let you work with a therapist in training. Bottom line is - do something.
LONELY: Lonely is a bigee. Not all of us are social or good at making friends. Get yourself into a group. Belonging does not mean that you have to be overly social. If you have a hobby join an association - be it a sports group, a music group, a volunteer group, or take a painting class or join a sculptor facility.  Get out there.
TIRED: Tired is something we tend to ignore. How many hours of sleep do you get? A good night's sleep gives you positive energy. What can you do to get proper sleep? Go to sleep with the TV off. Read something you like before you turn off the light. If you have sleepless issues you may want to see your physician.

The heart of the matter is to handle each one of these issues.


Posted by answersforteens at 2:30 PM EST
Updated: Sunday, 11 November 2018 2:44 PM EST
Monday, 22 October 2018
Have a disability?

Some of you may be interested in the following information:

My name is Ben Spangenberg, and I am the National Leadership Program Director at RespectAbility. We are a nonprofit organization fighting stigmas and advancing opportunities for diverse people with disabilities. As an openly gay man with a disability, I understand what it means to face barriers, prejudice and discrimination in the workforce. That is why it is so important for me to help the next generation of leaders acquire the skills and experience needed to be in high demand for the best policy, communications and development jobs.

I want to let you know about our National Leadership Program for young leaders who want to go into public policy, advocacy, communications or Hollywood, and who are committed to creating a better future. RespectAbility is looking to hire the next generation of leaders to be our Fellows, and we would love to have your help with identifying talented students who are committed to equal rights.

Here are facts we want to change:

  • Only 65 percent of students with disabilities graduate high school and only seven percent complete college.
  • Only 1-in-3 working age people with disabilities has a job.
  • There are 750,000 people with disabilities currently incarcerated in our nation.
RespectAbility currently is looking to hire Fellows for our Spring cohort that runs from January 14 to May 17, with flexibility for start dates. We will accept 12-15 outstanding applicants from around the country who want to advance disability issues and who are seeking careers in media, public policy or advocacy. The deadline is Nov. 13.

Fellows are given the unique opportunity to work with our highly trained program staff on communications and stigma reductionpublic policynonprofit fundraising or faith inclusion.

As a Fellow, they will have the chance to help our mission of:
  • Reducing the “school-to-prison-pipeline” for people with disabilities by advocating for students with disabilities so they get all of the tools they need to succeed in the classroom and beyond.
  • Erasing the nearly 50 percent gap in labor force participation rate so that diverse people with disabilities can have jobs and a better future.
  • Ensuring that diverse people with disabilities are accurately portrayed in Hollywood.
  • Educating philanthropists and nonprofits about how they can include people with disabilities equally in their work. 
Fellows also will work with mentors and professional staff, strengthening skills in advocacy and leadership as well as hands-on training in public speaking, writing, social media and networking. The Fellowship enables our young leaders to gain critical skills to start their careers in public policy, media or advocacy. Alumni of the program have gone on to work at the White House, Congress, advocacy organizations, The World Bank and elsewhere.   

There are opportunities for both paid and stipend Fellowships. Paid fellows make $15 an hour and we hire eight of them each year. Stipend Fellows receive a monthly transportation stipend of $300. Lunch is provided daily for all Fellows. In addition, all Fellows participate in special presentations by guest speakers and intensive strategic communications workshops.

To apply, young leaders must fill out our online application or for more information, contact Ben Spangenberg, National Leadership Director, at BenS@RespectAbility.org or call (202) 517-6272.

Thank you for your consideration and help!

Sincerely,

Ben Spangenberg
National Leadership Program Director
www.RespectAbility.org
 

 


Posted by answersforteens at 2:15 PM EDT
Wednesday, 3 October 2018
LOVE MUSIC
Topic: JUST DO IT

Music Cares has partnered with Facing Addiction to offer cash prizes to aspiring composers. Go to:

https://www.facingaddiction.org/teens-make-music-contest for details.

This is how they phrase it:

"If you’re a musician between the ages of 14-18, you’re invited to submit an original piece of music that celebrates life above the influence or brings attention to the real-life consequences of substance abuse. 1st place winners receive tickets to the 61st Annual GRAMMY Awards® and related events! Awards also include tickets to Vans Warped Tour, cash and other prizes!."

Good luck. This is what Benjamin Franklin said: "Nothing ventured, nothing gained."


Posted by answersforteens at 5:39 PM EDT
Updated: Wednesday, 3 October 2018 5:52 PM EDT
Monday, 3 September 2018
A CLOSER LOOK AT TRUST
Topic: HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT IT

Trust is important and  tough  when you live with a person who suffers with addiction. You never know when you can trust that person and when not. Take a piece of paper and a pen and write down a list of when you were able to trust the parent who suffers with addiction and then make a list when you were not able to trust that parent.

Why use paper and pen in this electronic age? Because your handwriting triggers emotions, makes memory more visual.

But lets get back to trust. Is there a pattern in your list? When a parent is free of drugs he or she may have valuable input. Some may be in a  bad mood and may not have valuable input.

This is why therapy is so important. Don't have access to therapy? Visit places like Alateen and  In The Rooms. They can help. They want to listen to you and their input will help you.


Posted by answersforteens at 11:07 AM EDT
Updated: Friday, 14 September 2018 11:47 AM EDT
Wednesday, 8 August 2018
Lets gather around
Topic: Hello Again

I did think of all of you during the month of July. However, my computer would not let me add a blog. I do think there is a little man or woman inside my computer who likes to play tricks on me. The good news is it is all fixed now.

September is coming up which is recovery month for addiction. You may want to take a quick look at

https://www.recoverymonth.gov/organizations-programs/answersforteenscom

The important thing is to remember that addiction is a disease. Living with someone who has this disease means three things: 

1. This is not your fault and you need to take care of yourself. Eat 3 meals a day. If need be find a healthy family with whom you can live. Do seek help. 

2. Make sure that you do not fall into the addiction trap. Remember you don't have to drink or take drugs. You may have inherited the sensitivity to addiction. 

3. If you can't afford to buy the book, For Teenagers Living With A Parent Who Abuses Alcohol/Drugs, ask your library to get the book. You have the right to a public library card and the right to ask the library to buy any book you need or to get it through another library. The book answers a lot of questions you may have and has a great resource chapter which tells you were to get help. 

You are an important person. Take good care of yourself.


Posted by answersforteens at 1:18 PM EDT
Updated: Monday, 3 September 2018 11:06 AM EDT
Wednesday, 6 June 2018
Graduating High School?
Topic: BE GOOD TO YOURSELF

Graduation is party time. So you know what I am going to say, "You don't have to drink." In most states it is illigal to serve alcohol to anyone under the age of 21 and may result in the arrest of the adult who serves alcohol to those under the age of 21.

Let's discuss something else too. Those of you who should have but did not graduate high school still can do so. I am talking about getting a GED. Do some research - where can you go to prepare for your GED? Take a practice GED test if need be more than once before you go for your GED test. Ask for help. If your school won't guide you go online or speak to a teacher who you liked. Perhaps your public library has information. Go to your library's reference desk. Make a plan. Remember a goal without a plan is only a wish.


Posted by answersforteens at 2:06 PM EDT
Thursday, 3 May 2018
THINK ABOUT THIS
Topic: There are solutions

Just because there is addiction in your family doesn't mean that you can't have a good, healthy life. Just say, "no." Stay away from alcohol and drugs.  You also know that a teenager's mind is not completely formed just the way the rest of your body has not stopped growing. Therefore drugs/alcohol can do damage to your brain which is still developing. Pick friends who also do not want to drink or take drugs. If you are in a situation where you are offered drinks or drugs be firm.

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has the following advice for teenagers.

Say no and let them know you mean it.

    Stand up straight.

    Make eye contact.

    Say how you feel.

    Don’t make excuses.

    Stand up for yourself.

               ***

Think through how you feel. Do you want to say, "I don't drink -period." Discuss what you might say with your other friends who don't drink.

 

 

 


Posted by answersforteens at 1:18 PM EDT
Thursday, 19 April 2018
MARK APRIL 26TH ON YOUR CALENDAR
Topic: A MESSAGE FROM SAMHSA

Copy and paste the web address below on google and then click on it:

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USSAMHSA/bulletins/1ea0791

Register to join the Recovery LIVE! Virtual Event: Supporting Underrepresented College Student Populations Experiencing or at Risk of Serious Mental Illness or Substance Use Disorders
Thursday, April 26, 2018 | 2–3 p.m. Eastern Time

*The event will highlight an array of collegiate recovery support models that assist students with serious mental illness or substance use disorders.

*Discuss opportunities for colleges and communities to provide recovery support services to help students at risk of developing, or experiencing, a serious mental illness or substance use disorder.

Go for it. Even if you are not a college student yet or do not plan to go to college the event will have valuable information. Be good to yourself.


Posted by answersforteens at 2:20 PM EDT
Updated: Thursday, 19 April 2018 2:36 PM EDT
Wednesday, 4 April 2018
From: NATIONAL COUNCIL ON ALCOHOLISM AND DRUG DEPENDENCE

Addiction is a disease.


It's important that we use language that frames it as a health issue and shows respect to people with an addiction and to their families who are impacted. Just like we would with any other disease, like diabetes or asthma.

A person shouldn’t be defined or labeled by his or her disease or illness, it is something they have. For example: Instead of calling someone a “diabetic,” it’s preferable to use person-first language and say “someone with diabetes.” The same goes with the word “addict.”

We have a choice when we communicate. We can use words that perpetuate the negative stigma around substance use – words that label people with an addiction in a negative, shameful and judgmental way. Or we can use words that are compassionate, supportive and respectful – words that helps others understand substance use disorder as the health issue that it is.

By choosing to rethink and reshape our language, we will allow people with an addiction to more easily regain their self-esteem and more comfortably seek treatment, allow lawmakers to appropriate funding, allow doctors to deliver better treatment, allow insurers to increase coverage of evidence-based treatment and help the public understand this is a medical condition and should be treated as such.

The Associated Press recently took an important step to stop using stigmatizing language toward people struggling with a substance use disorder, recognizing that words have power. We invite you to do the same.


Posted by answersforteens at 11:58 AM EDT
Sunday, 11 March 2018
Try This Radio Program
Topic: They'll take your phone call
At 8:07 AM Central Time only on Friday mornings you can listen to the talk show IT IS WHAT IT IS. The show comes out of Monroe, Louisiana. Just type the following on google: It Is What It Is – KMLB talk540.com/it-is-what-it-is/  and it will bring you to the right radio station. This show does not lecture, does not give a lot of advice. It accepts people's problems and discusses it in a down to earth way. It recognizes that you are in charge of your life and exposes facts and ideas to help you zero in on what you can do to lead a fuller life. Even better you can phone in and state your feelings.

Posted by answersforteens at 4:59 PM EST

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